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Archive for the ‘Forest of Arden’ Category

As you like it – Act five Scene Two

Orlando questions Oliver’s motives when he learns Oliver has fallen in love with Celia so quickly, even though he did the same with Rosalind.

ORLANDO

Is’t possible that on so little acquaintance you
should like her? that but seeing you should love
her? and loving woo? and, wooing, she should
grant? and will you persever to enjoy her?

Enter Rosalind who greets Oliver as leaves

ROSALIND

God save you, brother.

OLIVER

And you, fair sister.

Oliver is no fool.

Orlando is pleased for his brother but it is a double edged sword

ORLANDO

They shall be married to-morrow, and I will bid the
duke to the nuptial. But, O, how bitter a thing it
is to look into happiness through another man’s
eyes! By so much the more shall I to-morrow be at
the height of heart-heaviness, by how much I shall
think my brother happy in having what he wishes for.

Rosalind, seeing how unhappy Orlando is decides to remedy it.

ROSALIND

. Believe then, if
you please, that I can do strange things: I have,
since I was three year old, conversed with a
magician, most profound in his art and yet not
damnable. If you do love Rosalind so near the heart
as your gesture cries it out, when your brother
marries Aliena, shall you marry her:

Enter Phebe and her faithful pup, Silvius. They all are in love with the wrong person.

PHEBE

Good shepherd, tell this youth what ’tis to love.

SILVIUS

It is to be all made of sighs and tears;
And so am I for Phebe.

PHEBE

And I for Ganymede.

ORLANDO

And I for Rosalind.

ROSALIND

And I for no woman.

Rosalind has had enough.

ROSALIND

Pray you, no more of this; ’tis like the howling
of Irish wolves against the moon.

She promises to fix everybody’s problems as we shall see in the final scene.

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As you like it – Act Five scene One

Touchstone and Audrey are in the forest when Touchstone mentions a rival for his affections, and right on cue, he arrives

Touchstone and Audrey

TOUCHSTONE

…. Is thy name William?

WILLIAM

William, sir.

TOUCHSTONE

A fair name. Wast born i’ the forest here?

WILLIAM

Ay, sir, I thank God.

TOUCHSTONE

‘Thank God;’ a good answer. Art rich?

WILLIAM

Faith, sir, so so.

TOUCHSTONE

‘So so’ is good, very good, very excellent good; and
yet it is not; it is but so so. Art thou wise?

WILLIAM

Ay, sir, I have a pretty wit.

TOUCHSTONE

Why, thou sayest well. I do now remember a saying,
‘The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man
knows himself to be a fool.’

Touchstone is possessive of Audrey, even if his motives are suspect. He threatens poor William

TOUCHSTONE

. Therefore, you
clown, abandon,–which is in the vulgar leave,–the
society,–which in the boorish is company,–of this
female,–which in the common is woman; which
together is, abandon the society of this female, or,
clown, thou perishest; or, to thy better
understanding, diest; or, to wit I kill thee, make
thee away, translate thy life into death, thy
liberty into bondage: I will deal in poison with
thee, or in bastinado, or in steel; I will bandy
with thee in faction; I will o’errun thee with
policy; I will kill thee a hundred and fifty ways:
therefore tremble and depart.

Touchstone will marry Audrey, although I feel she would have been better off with William

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As you like it – Act Four Scene One

Jaques meets Rosalind and Celia

JAQUES

I prithee, pretty youth, let me be better acquainted
with thee.

ROSALIND

They say you are a melancholy fellow.

JAQUES

I am so; I do love it better than laughing.

Jaques describes his melancholy

JAQUES

I have neither the scholar’s melancholy, which is
emulation, nor the musician’s, which is fantastical,
nor the courtier’s, which is proud, nor the
soldier’s, which is ambitious, nor the lawyer’s,
which is politic, nor the lady’s, which is nice, nor
the lover’s, which is all these: but it is a
melancholy of mine own, compounded of many simples,
extracted from many objects, and indeed the sundry’s
contemplation of my travels, in which my often
rumination wraps me m a most humorous sadness

 He dparts when Orlando turns up. Rosalind is unhappy with the lateness of Orlando

ORLANDO

My fair Rosalind, I come within an hour of my promise.

ROSALIND

Break an hour’s promise in love! He that will
divide a minute into a thousand parts and break but
a part of the thousandth part of a minute in the
affairs of love, it may be said of him that Cupid
hath clapped him o’ the shoulder, but I’ll warrant
him heart-whole.

 She teases him and asks him to woo her as if she was Rosalind

ROSALIND

Come, woo me, woo me, for now I am in a holiday
humour and like enough to consent. What would you
say to me now, an I were your very very Rosalind?

ORLANDO

I would kiss before I spoke.

ROSALIND

Nay, you were better speak first, and when you were
gravelled for lack of matter, you might take
occasion to kiss.

Orlando vows he will die if Rosalind ever spurned him

ROSALIND

. The poor world is
almost six thousand years old, and in all this time
there was not any man died in his own person,
videlicit, in a love-cause. Troilus had his brains
dashed out with a Grecian club; yet he did what he
could to die before, and he is one of the patterns
of love. Leander, he would have lived many a fair
year, though Hero had turned nun, if it had not been
for a hot midsummer night; for, good youth, he went
but forth to wash him in the Hellespont and being
taken with the cramp was drowned and the foolish
coroners of that age found it was ‘Hero of Sestos.’
But these are all lies: men have died from time to
time and worms have eaten them, but not for love.

 Rosalind changes tact and becomes more flirty

ROSALIND

By this hand, it will not kill a fly. But come, now
I will be your Rosalind in a more coming-on
disposition, and ask me what you will. I will grant
it.

ORLANDO

Then love me, Rosalind.

ROSALIND

Yes, faith, will I, Fridays and Saturdays and all.

ORLANDO

And wilt thou have me?

ROSALIND

Ay, and twenty such.

ORLANDO

What sayest thou?

ROSALIND

Are you not good?

ORLANDO

I hope so.

ROSALIND

Why then, can one desire too much of a good thing?

Celia plays along and “pretends” to marry them

ORLANDO

Pray thee, marry us.

CELIA

I cannot say the words.

ROSALIND

You must begin, ‘Will you, Orlando–‘

CELIA

Go to. Will you, Orlando, have to wife this Rosalind?

ORLANDO

I will.

ROSALIND

Ay, but when?

ORLANDO

Why now; as fast as she can marry us.

ROSALIND

Then you must say ‘I take thee, Rosalind, for wife.’

ORLANDO

I take thee, Rosalind, for wife.

ROSALIND

I might ask you for your commission; but I do take
thee, Orlando, for my husband

Orlando departs to meet the duke leaving the girls alone. Rosalind finally lets her disguise down

ROSALIND

O coz, coz, coz, my pretty little coz, that thou
didst know how many fathom deep I am in love! But
it cannot be sounded: my affection hath an unknown
bottom, like the bay of Portugal.

CELIA

Or rather, bottomless, that as fast as you pour
affection in, it runs out.

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As You Like It – Act Three Scene Four & Five

Scene Four

Rosalind is impatient as Orlando has not turned up.

ROSALIND

But why did he swear he would come this morning, and
comes not?

CELIA

Nay, certainly, there is no truth in him.

ROSALIND

Do you think so?

CELIA

Yes; I think he is not a pick-purse nor a
horse-stealer, but for his verity in love, I do
think him as concave as a covered goblet or a
worm-eaten nut.

ROSALIND

Not true in love?

CELIA

Yes, when he is in; but I think he is not in.

ROSALIND

You have heard him swear downright he was.

CELIA

‘Was’ is not ‘is:

Corin enter and tells them to come see Silvius and his love Phebe 

Scene Five

SILVIUS

Sweet Phebe, do not scorn me; do not, Phebe;
Say that you love me not, but say not so
In bitterness. The common executioner,
Whose heart the accustom’d sight of death makes hard,
Falls not the axe upon the humbled neck
But first begs pardon: will you sterner be
Than he that dies and lives by bloody drops?

Pheobe denies hurting Silvius but poor Silvius is in Love

PHEBE

but now mine eyes,
Which I have darted at thee, hurt thee not,
Nor, I am sure, there is no force in eyes
That can do hurt.

SILVIUS

O dear Phebe,
If ever,–as that ever may be near,–
You meet in some fresh cheek the power of fancy,
Then shall you know the wounds invisible
That love’s keen arrows make.

Rosalind intervenes and chides Phebe

ROSALIND

And why, I pray you? Who might be your mother,
That you insult, exult, and all at once,
Over the wretched? What though you have no beauty,–
As, by my faith, I see no more in you
Than without candle may go dark to bed–
Must you be therefore proud and pitiless?
Why, what means this?

 Rosalind continues

Rosalind

For I must tell you friendly in your ear,
Sell when you can: you are not for all markets:
Cry the man mercy; love him; take his offer:

Phebe is stirred by the sight of Rosalind, dressed as a man.

PHEBE

Sweet youth, I pray you, chide a year together:
I had rather hear you chide than this man woo.

Is this next phrase another reference to Christopher Marlowe?

PHEBE

Dead Shepherd, now I find thy saw of might,
‘Who ever loved that loved not at first sight?’

Phebe, pretending to Silvius that she hates Ganymede, decides to write a letter to him and Silvius can bear it.

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As you like it – Act Two Scenes Two and Three

As you like it – Act Two Scene Two

Back in the court and Duke Frederick has found his daughter missing.

DUKE FREDERICK

Can it be possible that no man saw them?
It cannot be: some villains of my court
Are of consent and sufferance in this.

First Lord

I cannot hear of any that did see her.
The ladies, her attendants of her chamber,
Saw her abed, and in the morning early
They found the bed untreasured of their mistress.

The duke demands a search is made, starting with Orlando’s brother

DUKE FREDERICK

Send to his brother; fetch that gallant hither;
If he be absent, bring his brother to me;
I’ll make him find him: do this suddenly,
And let not search and inquisition quail
To bring again these foolish runaways.

Act Two Scene Three

Orlando, who is the subject of a hunt, meets Adam his old servant who warns that Orlando’s brother means to burn down his house tonight whilst he is asleep.

ADAM

O unhappy youth!
Come not within these doors; within this roof
The enemy of all your graces lives:
Your brother–no, no brother; yet the son–
Yet not the son, I will not call him son
Of him I was about to call his father–
Hath heard your praises, and this night he means
To burn the lodging where you use to lie
And you within it: if he fail of that,
He will have other means to cut you off.
I overheard him and his practises.
This is no place; this house is but a butchery:
Abhor it, fear it, do not enter it.

They decide to flee together, with the money that Adam has saved, for Orlando has no money of his own as his elder brother keeps the money from him

Orlando

But, poor old man, thou prunest a rotten tree,
That cannot so much as a blossom yield
In lieu of all thy pains and husbandry
But come thy ways; well go along together,
And ere we have thy youthful wages spent,
We’ll light upon some settled low content.

ADAM

Master, go on, and I will follow thee,
To the last gasp, with truth and loyalty

They flee from the court into the unknown dangers of the forest

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Forest of Arden

As you like it – Act Two Scene One

We are in the Forest of Arden and meet the exiled Duke and his lords.

DUKE SENIOR

Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile,
Hath not old custom made this life more sweet
Than that of painted pomp? Are not these woods
More free from peril than the envious court?

He is happy in his forced exile and would not change this forest for the court. He suggests killing a deer for food.

DUKE SENIOR

Come, shall we go and kill us venison?
And yet it irks me the poor dappled fools,
Being native burghers of this desert city,
Should in their own confines with forked heads
Have their round haunches gored.

We are introduced to the character of Jaques, before we meet him.

First Lord

Indeed, my lord,
The melancholy Jaques grieves at that,
And, in that kind, swears you do more usurp
Than doth your brother that hath banish’d you.

After a speech about Jaques seeing a wounded deer they go to find him.

DUKE SENIOR

Show me the place:
I love to cope him in these sullen fits,
For then he’s full of matter.

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