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Julius Caesar Act 5 Scene 4

The battle rages on. Cato is killed and Lucilius, pretending to be Brutus, is captured.

Scene 5

Enter Brutus and Soldiers. Knowing the battle is lost, he asks them to help him kill himself. They all refuse except Strato

BRUTUS

I prithee, Strato, stay thou by thy lord:
Thou art a fellow of a good respect;
Thy life hath had some smatch of honour in it:
Hold then my sword, and turn away thy face,
While I do run upon it. Wilt thou, Strato?

STRATO

Give me your hand first. Fare you well, my lord.

BRUTUS

Farewell, good Strato.

Runs on his sword

Caesar, now be still:
I kill’d not thee with half so good a will.

Dies

He dies with Caesar on his lips, just like Cassius in Act 5 Scene 3

Enter Antony and Octavius. They see Brutus lying dead.

ANTONY

This was the noblest Roman of them all:
All the conspirators save only he
Did that they did in envy of great Caesar;
He only, in a general honest thought
And common good to all, made one of them.
His life was gentle, and the elements
So mix’d in him that Nature might stand up
And say to all the world ‘This was a man!

THE END

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Julius Caesar Act Five Scene 2 & 3 

Scene 2

Brutus orders all the troops to attack Octavius’ side. He hopes for a quick victory.

Scene 3

With Brutus’ troops attacking Octavius. Cassius is overrun. He asks Titinius to ride and see how the battle is going, whether the troops in the distance are his or the enemy. He rides off and Pindarus reports that he is captured. Cassius realises he is beaten, on his birthday too.

CASSIUS

This day I breathed first: time is come round,
And where I did begin, there shall I end;
My life is run his compass. 

He orders Pindarus to stab him, even with the sword that killed Caesar.

CASSIUS
O, coward that I am, to live so long,
To see my best friend ta’en before my face!

PINDARUS descends

Come hither, sirrah:
In Parthia did I take thee prisoner;
And then I swore thee, saving of thy life,
That whatsoever I did bid thee do,
Thou shouldst attempt it. Come now, keep thine oath;
Now be a freeman: and with this good sword,
That ran through Caesar’s bowels, search this bosom.
Stand not to answer: here, take thou the hilts;
And, when my face is cover’d, as ’tis now,
Guide thou the sword.

PINDARUS stabs him

Caesar, thou art revenged,
Even with the sword that kill’d thee.

Dies

He dies with Caesar on his lips.

Titinius returns with Messala. Titinius was not captured as Cassius thought. They see the body on the ground.

MESSALA

Is not that he?

TITINIUS

No, this was he, Messala,
But Cassius is no more. O setting sun,
As in thy red rays thou dost sink to-night,
So in his red blood Cassius’ day is set;
The sun of Rome is set! Our day is gone;
Clouds, dews, and dangers come; our deeds are done!
Mistrust of my success hath done this deed.

MESSALA

Mistrust of good success hath done this deed.
O hateful error, melancholy’s child,
Why dost thou show to the apt thoughts of men
The things that are not? O error, soon conceived,
Thou never comest unto a happy birth,
But kill’st the mother that engender’d thee

Titinius, alone gives Cassius a garland of victory and then kills himself with Cassius’ sword.

Enter Brutus, he mourns the death of Titinius and Cassius but vows to keep fighting.

At the RSC in 2007, we saw this play and the fake blood was in full force. When Titinius stabbed himself the blood spurted out.

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Julius Caesar – Act five Scene One

Octavius and Antony prepare for battle. Are there signs of tension already growing between them like Brutus and Cassius?

ANTONY

Octavius, lead your battle softly on,
Upon the left hand of the even field.

OCTAVIUS

Upon the right hand I; keep thou the left.

ANTONY

Why do you cross me in this exigent?

OCTAVIUS

I do not cross you; but I will do so

Enter Brutus and Cassius (with soldiers). A war of words then ensues between the two camps.

BRUTUS

Words before blows: is it so, countrymen?

ANTONY

Villains, you did not so, when your vile daggers
Hack’d one another in the sides of Caesar:
You show’d your teeth like apes, and fawn’d like hounds,
And bow’d like bondmen, kissing Caesar’s feet;
Whilst damned Casca, like a cur, behind
Struck Caesar on the neck. O you flatterers!

CASSIUS

Flatterers! Now, Brutus, thank yourself:
This tongue had not offended so to-day,
If Cassius might have ruled

See Act two scene one where Cassius urged the Conspirators to kill Antony as well as Caesar but Brutus persuaded them not to.

After more posturing Antony and Octavius depart.

CASSIUS

Why, now, blow wind, swell billow and swim bark!
The storm is up, and all is on the hazard

Brutus and Cassius say their farewells and prepare for the battle. 

BRUTUS

Why, then, lead on. O, that a man might know
The end of this day’s business ere it come!
But it sufficeth that the day will end,
And then the end is known. Come, ho! away!

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Act four 2 & 3

This is really only one long scene split into two parts. Inside and outside the tent

In Brutus’ camp near Sardis he is waiting for Cassius to arrive. Things have cooled between them since the Assassination of Caesar and fleeing Rome

BRUTUS

….. A word, Lucilius;
How he received you, let me be resolved.

LUCILIUS

With courtesy and with respect enough;
But not with such familiar instances,
Nor with such free and friendly conference,
As he hath used of old.

BRUTUS

Thou hast described
A hot friend cooling: ever note, Lucilius,
When love begins to sicken and decay,
It useth an enforced ceremony

Cassius arrives and they begin to argue until Brutus rightly says that they shouldn’t appear hostile in front of the troops. They go inside the tent

Scene 3

BRUTUS

Let me tell you, Cassius, you yourself
Are much condemn’d to have an itching palm;
To sell and mart your offices for gold
To undeservers.

CASSIUS

I an itching palm!
You know that you are Brutus that speak this,
Or, by the gods, this speech were else your last.

BRUTUS

The name of Cassius honours this corruption,
And chastisement doth therefore hide his head

The strains of war are showing on them both.  Brutus still thinks that he is in the right and has honour on his side.

BRUTUS

There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats,
For I am arm’d so strong in honesty
That they pass by me as the idle wind,
Which I respect not.

Brutus asked for money to pay his troops and Cassius refused to send him any. Cassius insists that it is a misunderstanding

BRUTUS

I do not like your faults.

CASSIUS

A friendly eye could never see such faults.

BRUTUS

A flatterer’s would not, though they do appear
As huge as high Olympus.

Cassius takes out his dagger and asks Brutus to stab him if he cannot love him. Brutus relents and they agree to stay friends and forget. Brutus explains why is in such a mood.

CASSIUS

I did not think you could have been so angry.

BRUTUS

O Cassius, I am sick of many griefs.

CASSIUS

Of your philosophy you make no use,
If you give place to accidental evils.

BRUTUS

No man bears sorrow better. Portia is dead. 

Brutus has received a letter explaining Portia’s death to him. Link to Wiki Biography of Portia

CASSIUS

How ‘scaped I killing when I cross’d you so?
O insupportable and touching loss!
Upon what sickness?

BRUTUS

Impatient of my absence,
And grief that young Octavius with Mark Antony
Have made themselves so strong:–for with her death
That tidings came;–with this she fell distract,
And, her attendants absent, swallow’d fire

Allegedly, full of grief, she committed suicide by swallowing hot coals.

Council of war.

With Titinius and Messala they discuss the plan for the upcoming battle. Should they wait and rest of march to Philippi. Cassius would wait but Brutus urges them to go forward.

BRUTUS

Under your pardon. You must note beside,
That we have tried the utmost of our friends,
Our legions are brim-full, our cause is ripe:
The enemy increaseth every day;
We, at the height, are ready to decline.
There is a tide in the affairs of men,
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
On such a full sea are we now afloat;
And we must take the current when it serves,
Or lose our ventures.

Agreed they depart and Brutus settles to sleep but is disturbed by

The Ghost

Enter the Ghost of CAESAR

How ill this taper burns! Ha! who comes here?
I think it is the weakness of mine eyes
That shapes this monstrous apparition.
It comes upon me. Art thou any thing?
Art thou some god, some angel, or some devil
That makest my blood cold and my hair to stare?
Speak to me what thou art.

GHOST

Thy evil spirit, Brutus.

BRUTUS

Why comest thou?

GHOST

To tell thee thou shalt see me at Philipp

Note that when Brutus asks “What art thou?” the answer is “Thy evil spirit, Brutus”.  Caesar is blaming him. This is taken directly from the writings of Plutarch.  Frightened Brutus wakes his men and they make preparations for battle as we prepare for the final act.

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Act three, Scene one

CASSIUS

………..How many ages hence
Shall this our lofty scene be acted over
In states unborn and accents yet unknown

I wonder if Shakespeare imagined that those words are still being spoke over four hundred years later

It’s the Ides of March (15th) and Caesar is at the Capitol. The Conspirators get ready for the bloody deed.  Decius Brutus asks Caesar to pardon his brother. Caesar answers

CAESAR

I could be well moved, if I were as you:
If I could pray to move, prayers would move me:
But I am constant as the northern star,
Of whose true-fix’d and resting quality
There is no fellow in the firmament.
The skies are painted with unnumber’d sparks,
They are all fire and every one doth shine,
But there’s but one in all doth hold his place:
So in the world; ’tis furnish’d well with men,
And men are flesh and blood, and apprehensive;
Yet in the number I do know but one
That unassailable holds on his rank,
Unshaked of motion: and that I am he,
Let me a little show it, even in this;
That I was constant Cimber should be banish’d,
And constant do remain to keep him so. 

This is enough to kill him. The Conspirators stab him and we get the famous line of the play

CAESAR

Et tu, Brute! Then fall, Caesar

 

Morte di Giulio Cesare ("Death of Julius ...

Image via Wikipedia

 

When I saw this at Stratford, this scene was incredible and very realistic.                “Who would have thought the old man to have so much blood in him”

Mark Antony enters and sees the bloody corpse of Caesar and breaks down.

ANTONY

O mighty Caesar! dost thou lie so low?
Are all thy conquests, glories, triumphs, spoils,
Shrunk to this little measure? Fare thee well.
I know not, gentlemen, what you intend,
Who else must be let blood, who else is rank:
If I myself, there is no hour so fit
As Caesar’s death hour, nor no instrument
Of half that worth as those your swords, made rich
With the most noble blood of all this world.
I do beseech ye, if you bear me hard,
Now, whilst your purpled hands do reek and smoke,
Fulfil your pleasure. Live a thousand years,
I shall not find myself so apt to die:
No place will please me so, no mean of death,
As here by Caesar, and by you cut off,
The choice and master spirits of this age

Brutus convinces him that they mean him no harm. He will allow Antony to speak, after Brutus, to the public. Antony is left alone.

ANTONY

O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth,
That I am meek and gentle with these butchers!
Thou art the ruins of the noblest man
That ever lived in the tide of times.
Woe to the hand that shed this costly blood!
Over thy wounds now do I prophesy,–
Which, like dumb mouths, do ope their ruby lips,
To beg the voice and utterance of my tongue–
A curse shall light upon the limbs of men;
Domestic fury and fierce civil strife
Shall cumber all the parts of Italy;
Blood and destruction shall be so in use
And dreadful objects so familiar
That mothers shall but smile when they behold
Their infants quarter’d with the hands of war;
All pity choked with custom of fell deeds:
And Caesar’s spirit, ranging for revenge,
With Ate by his side come hot from hell,
Shall in these confines with a monarch’s voice
Cry ‘Havoc,’ and let slip the dogs of war;
That this foul deed shall smell above the earth
With carrion men, groaning for burial

Ate is the Goddess of Discord and Mischief.

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   Today is St Swithins day.  According to folklore whatever the weather does today will be the trend for the next 40 days.

   So what better day to blog about ACT ONE SCENE THREE of Julius Caesar

 

Lightning animation.
Tempest dropping fire

 

Cicero and Casca meet in a storm. Casca is frightened and reads portents in the weather.

CASCA

Either there is a civil strife in heaven,
Or else the world, too saucy with the gods,
Incenses them to send destruction

 

CASCA

When these prodigies
Do so conjointly meet, let not men say
‘These are their reasons; they are natural;’
For, I believe, they are portentous things
Unto the climate that they point upon.

 

Cicero is more realistic, and how apt is this phrase

CICERO

But men may construe things after their fashion,
Clean from the purpose of the things themselves.

 Just look at the conspiracy videos on YouTube.

 Casca meets Cassius who persuades him to join him in overthrowing Caesar….Brutus is next

 The weather outside in fine and sunny. So 40 more days of that please St Swithin….

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